Wednesday, October 6, 2010

The World According to the History Channel

Long, long ago the ancient Egyptians created a great and noble civilization renowned for its architecture, a complex writing system and sumptuous art.  The most important Egyptian was the boy king, Tutankhamun, who died at the age of nineteen.  He was buried in the Valley of Kings in Luxor along with a bunch of golden cat statues.  After that, World War II broke out, and brave allied soldiers risked their lives on the black and white battlefields of Europe eventually defeating the Germans led by Adolf Hitler.


The End.

(PS.  If anyone knows of anything else that might have happened between 1323 BC and 1939, please could you contact the History Channel here and let them know.)

Thanks,

7 comments:

  1. Problem is, I don’t have a television, so I didn’t even know those things happened. I feel enriched now, thank you.
    The enigmatic, masked blogger strikes again

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  2. You're welcome. And now if you do ever get a television you won't need to bother getting the History Channel!

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  3. Hi Tracey,
    Maybe one should inform the History Channel about the discovery of North America.
    Now then, in regards to Egyptians, did you know they liked to gather together and all eat the same type of potent baked beans, thus they could all 'toot in common'...I know that joke kinda' 'Sphinx'..

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  4. Wow...*groan*
    It must be late there - try and get some sleep :)
    Tracey

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  5. You have nicely pierced the bubble of the History Channel's image with you accurate remark Tracey.
    That big history gap is being filled by the BBC in the UK; they appear to be fixated on the Norman invasion so it's 1066 and all that.

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  6. Don't be silly, there isn't anything more than that. Everyone was too exhausted from burying all that egyptian stuff to do anything else until 1939.

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  7. 1066. How super boring! (Although much more interesting than Canadian history, with Will the Conqueror and all that). I remember going to England once, and ended up in Hastings - I drove around for hours looking for the Bayeux Tapestry, only to stop and ask someone, who told me that it was in Bayeux. Duh. Wrong country altogether. Although, maybe it doesn't really exist, and it's as omawarisan said that everyone was too tired to do anything else until World War 2.

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